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Showing posts from 2019

Māori@Marshland - Korimako

By Taryn Woodham
A korowai is a Māori cloak, it was made in early Māori times and it is normally woven or made from traditional materials like flax or feathers. The Korowai was usually worn by people with prestige or honour, like chiefs.

Today it is still used as a symbol of belonging or unity, and can be worn by anyone. Our Korowai is made from feathers that we all created, so it has a piece of us all inside it. This signifies our belonging to Korimako and shows how all of us together make our hub a strong, encouraging and welcoming learning space.

Māori@Marshland - Tui

By Sam Jones

In Tui we have been integrating Te Reo Māori by making it a regular part of our daily routines. When doing the morning roll the children are able to greet their home teacher in Māori. We have been practicing using Morena, Kia Ora and Ata Mārie to do this, After this, we move into our Manawa space where we begin the day together. To signify the team that we are, we stand together and say the school Karakia together.

Our Tamariki especially love it when we have a birthday in the Hub. This calls for the special birthday boy/girl to stand up in front so we can sing happy birthday to them in Te Reo. Having Mr V as part of the Tui team means that we get to sing some waiata. Here is a video of one of our favourites!


Māori@Marshland - Kiwi

By Emma Jackson
Kiwi Hub integrated Te Reo into our daily programme, by making it a natural part of the children's learning. We have been teaching our tamariki all the ways they can greet in Māori. We begin our day by greeting each other and singing our morning karakia. We then ask our tamariki "Ko te aha tēnei rā?" (What day is this?), to which they reply by telling us what day it is in Māori. During our morning Brain Break, the children count forwards and in Māori and then backwards as well, which is quite tricky - we are getting better at it. :)

Māori@Marshland - Pukeko

By Matthew Boyce
The Pukeko children have been learning how to use 'tena koutou' (hello to three or more children) and 'tena koe' (hello to one person) to greet others during Circle Time. We have also been using 'ka kite' at the end of the day to farewell others.